How to – The Ultimate Guide: Running Toilet

According to data released by the Environment Protection Agency a constantly running toilet could waste about 200 gallons of water a day. Fixing the running toilet in your home can, therefore, reduce your utility bill apart from giving you the satisfaction of having done your bit toward ensuring a greener tomorrow. Some people say the EPA destroys jobs and forces businesses to invest overseas because of some goofy rules but this is not one of them. Just because a dictation is coming from the EPA, it does not mean that is based on fake science. The constant sound of water running in your toilet and the toilet tank getting filled can soon become a major source of irritation. However, a running toilet is not just a nuisance as it can increase your water bill and could cause problems in your septic tank. Even a minor leak on from the toilet tank into the bowl can result in the loss of many gallons of fresh water in a week.

Simple Solutions. Often a running toilet is caused by a simple malfunctioning part that can be fixed by most people who are handy with tools. Before you call a plumber to look at your running toilet, try these simple solutions. Remember to cut of water supply to the toilet tank before you open it. Also, even though the toilet tank stores fresh water, it is a good idea to wear gloves and wash your hands thoroughly after you finish working on this project. Remove the lid of the toilet tank and inspect the interior. This will often help you locate the problem in the tank. A visual inspection can reveal sedimentation, broken parts, clogged inlets, and other problems that can be fixed without too much effort. Sometimes the inlet pipe to the tank can get clogged resulting in uneven water flow. This will cause a running toilet. Just clean the inlet to fix the problem. The sediments in the inlet pipe can be removed using a brush or wire. Guide rod and chain: Check the guide rod or chain in the toilet stopper. If the chain is twisted or the rod is bent, straighten these to stop the running. Sometimes the length of the chain is the cause of the problem. An extra-long chain can become tangled while a short chain can prevent the mechanism from functioning properly. By adjusting the length of the chain, you should be able to stop your toilet from wasting water. The valve seat and stopper might be corroded or damaged because of sediments. You need to first try and clean them. If this does not fix the problem, you will need to replace them. In some cases the entire flush valve assembly might need to be replaced. For this you need to first remove the assembly and take it to a hardware store to get the appropriate replacement. You then have to install the new system in your toilet tank. Those who are handy with tools and have the time to spare can try doing this on their own.

A few things to keep in mind.

Flapper: Old flappers become stiff and prevent automatic closure. By replacing the flapper, the running toilet will be fixed.

Float: The float in the toilet tank needs to be above the water level to stop water overflow. Sometimes, water enters the float and submerges it. This happens when the float is damaged or punctured. Just unscrew the float and screw on a new one to stop water wastage.

Rubber seals: The flush valve and flapper have rubber seals that can get damaged over time. Replacing them with new seals will often fix a running toilet.

Lever: The lever connected to the float can break because of constant use. Replacing this can ensure that the float is position properly and fix a running toilet.

Act promptly to fix a running toilet, instead of silently putting up with the inconvenience when water and your money are drained away. The cost of fixing the toilet can be recovered in the savings from your water bill. And if you live in Phoenix, San Diego, Las Vegas, or LA, you know how precious fresh water is.

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Fixing a Leaky Kitchen Faucet

Two typical reasons the kitchen sink is dripping are because you have loose nuts or washers that went bad. That is as long as it’s a compression faucet. In that case, the fix is pretty simple. Unless, you forget to turn off the water.  The shut-off valve is normally found right under the sink. In some cases, it might be hiding inside a floor cabinet.  Turn on the faucet. Nothing should come out. You want to be positive as you don’t want to become a character in some screwball comedy.

Identify The Faucet. Which kind of faucet do you have? The four kinds of faucets are: disk, compression, ball and cartridge. The ball, disc and cartridge faucets are “washerless.” They don’t use either neoprene of rubber washers. The compression model is just your basic washer-faucet. It does have a washer inside which is usually the culprit when it comes to leaks and drips. Ball-type faucets are pretty complicated. It uses a lot of different parts which makes it a type of brain-surgery project. Best bet: Just purchase a replacement kit. If it’s an older faucet, you may have to take a more expensive route and replace the whole fixture. Disc-type Faucets on the other hand are the modern, single lever faucets. They employ a pair of ceramic discs that slide across each other to handle not just the water’s temperature, but also the speed which the water flows. If a disc-type is leaking, one of the seals is damaged. Find the set-screw. Loosen it just enough to take off the handle. Under the removed arm is the escutcheon cap. Take that off, placing it aside. Unscrew the mounting screws and pull-out the cylinder. The neoprene seals could be worn. Or it could be as simple as there’s a little sand under their collar. Either clean them or replace them and put everything back together.

Still leaking? You may need to replace the cylinder. Same process as the above, only now you’re taking out the old and dropping in the new. For cartridge faucets, remove the decorative cap on the handle, take out the handle screw, push the handle back and pull it off. You might run into a threaded retaining clip that keeps the cartridge in place. Get out the needle-nosed pliers to extract it. Pull the cartridge up-and-out. Expose the spout. Chop-off the old O-rings, coat the new O-rings with plumber’s grease and put the thing back together. It only costs about $15 to replace the entire cartridge. Match the new one with the old.

A Compression Faucet Fix. Grab a handful of different sized washers, a screwdriver that will work with the existing screw and an adjustable wrench. If you have any Teflon® tape, bring it along to help with the merger of the packing nut and what lies below. With your wrench, tighten the packing nut. Turn the water back on. Has the dripping stopped dropping? You’re done. But it’s never that easy. Turn-off the water again. Rotate the packing nut, this time, counter-clockwise. Extract the entire valve unit. Twist and turn it until it breaks free.

Replace The Washer. We’re scrutinizing the valve unit when we notice the old washer, looking all haggard. There’s a screw holding the scraggly, soon-to-be, ex-washer in place. Remove the screw that’s in bad shape and replace it with the new washer. When everything is copacetic – the new washer is in its place – rescrew the screw. It’s time to put everything back together. Make sure when you replant the valve, it is pointed in the same direction it was before you started messing around. Tighten up the packing nut.

Dripping faucets can use a lot of water for no purpose other than annoying you with clock-like sounding drops. Unrepaired, it’s not only noisy, it’s costing you money. The fix you perform will pay for itself in the long run.

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Clogged Garbage Disposal

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that leaking and clogged drains also be fixed to ensure that cockroaches are denied access to water source. Anything you can do to negatively impact a cockroach and their entire species is a good thing as well. This will ensure that there is a lower chance of the spread of disease which can and will lead to a healthier home environment. Everyone would love to cook and eat in a clean kitchen. However, a kitchen with a clogged garbage disposal ends up looking unsightly, is dirty, smelly, and attracts insects such as cockroaches. While no one wants a clogged garbage disposal, often the pressures of everyday life mean that we inadvertently put food or other substances into the disposal that cause it to clog. Garbage disposal unit clogging is often caused by insufficient water to wash away the ground waste. It also happens when you grind egg shells, potato peels, banana peels, or coffee grounds in the garbage disposal unit. The small granular waste produced by egg shells and coffee grounds can stick to sludge and cause clogs. The starch and fiber in potato and banana peels too are a potent mix that clogs the drains.

Avoid Chemicals. When faced with a clogged garbage disposal first try these simple strategies to unclog it. It is best to avoid chemical drain cleaners when you have a garbage disposal unit as these can damage the unit, cause health hazards in your kitchen, and frequently do not work.

Water Heater Leaking Scenarios. Sometimes the clog is in the plumbing line that enters the wall or beyond it. In such cases you need to use a sink auger to clear the obstruction. To use an auger, first ensure that the trap is safely removed with a container kept under the trap to catch any drips and spills. Use a pipe wrench to loosen the slip nuts on either side of the trap. After removing the trap, extend the auger cable into the flat portion of the pipe. Once the cable touches the clog, pull out 12 more inches of cable and then tighten the set screw. Once this is done you need to turn the crank handle gently but firmly. Keep extending the cable until you have cleared the entire length of the clog. Now fix the trap back and turn the hot water faucet on to flush the drain and ensure that all debris is washed away. If you are too busy to do all this or do not want to purchase an auger and learn how to use it, just call a licensed and reliable plumber to come and unclog your garbage disposal for you. When faced with a clogged garbage disposal first try these simple strategies to unclog it. It is best to avoid chemical drain cleaners when you have a garbage disposal unit as these can damage the unit, cause health hazards in your kitchen, and frequently do not work. Switch off power to the garbage disposal and then check the garbage disposal for the presence of a hard object just as a bone or metal piece that could have been accidently introduced into it. If you spot such an object, just remove it using tongs and flush the garbage disposal to ensure that water now flows quickly and smoothly. Never use your hands to remove particles from a garbage disposal unit as you are likely to get injured. If that does not clear the clog, the trap on the waste discharge side of the garbage disposal could be clogged. The garbage disposal usually manages to grind all the food waste placed in it but without plenty of water the ground waste just sticks to the outlet pipes. This sludge is what causes clogs. Most often the clog is located in the waste trap. This is the S or P shaped pipe or plumbing that is located after the garbage disposal unit. Place a lined container under the waste trap to ensure that any water or sludge does not land on the kitchen floor, remove the trap and clear it of the clog before replacing it.

A clogged garbage disposal can cause ill health or force you to order food because you are unable to use the kitchen as you should be able to. By choosing to retain a plumber to unclog the garbage disposal you will be able to use your kitchen and enjoy both the cooking and the food. While the unclogging of a garbage disposal is fairly simple, a professional plumber can relieve you of the chore. Save time and money by calling a plumber

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Fix a Cracked Toilet

While no one wants to deal with redoing their entire bathroom out of obligation, there are many questions people have about their cracked toilets. Is the crack dangerous, or merely cosmetic? Does it matter where the crack is? What kinds of cracks can be repaired? If it can’t be repaired, should I replace the entire toilet? A cracked toilet can pose a variety of problems for homeowners, the biggest being the potential for a major blow out and extensive water damage. In this guide, we’ll tackle all those important questions, and provide you with instructions on how to identify your cracked toilet problem, as well as give detailed instructions on how to repair your hairline cracks with epoxy. Take a good look at the cracks in your toilet. Is it a tiny hairline crack on the outside? Are there multiple hairline cracks? Are there any cracks on the inside of the bowl or the tank? If you are seeing hairline cracks that may appear to be only cosmetic, we will show you how to patch and repair them using plumbing epoxy.

Prepare the Supplies for this project.

Silicone Plumbing Epoxy – This waterproof epoxy will seal and patch up tiny cracks on your toilet.

Caulking Gun – Use this to apply epoxy to your cracks.

Sponges, Towels and Cloths – Use these to completely dry out the entire toilet before you begin the application of your epoxy.

Adjustable Crescent Wrench – Not only will this make you feel like an awesome professional plumber, but you’ll be using this kind of wrench to disconnect the toilet’s water supply as well.

Let’s get started!

Identify the Problem. Hairline cracks around the outside of the toilet are often cosmetic, and can be repaired with the application of plumbing epoxy to seal them. Cracks on the inside of the bowl are cause for alarm, and may result in needing to replace the entire toilet. Being able to identify the location, size and type of crack on the various parts of your toilet will save you time and money in deciding on a proper solution to your problem. As an example, if a crack has occurred on the inside of your tank, and is over 1/16 inch wide, you should most likely replace your tank.

So Long Water Supply. First thing’s first, let’s disconnect the water supply heading into the tank before you drain your toilet. You can turn off the water supply at the shutoff valve located beside and behind the toilet. Once it is turned off, flush the toilet to drain it. Now we can grab our handy adjustable crescent wrench to disconnect the water supply line from the tank.

Dry Toilet Humor . Now that your toilet is disconnected from its water supply and thoroughly drained, use those towels, sponges and cloths to dry out every part of the toilet. Use the towels and sponges to absorb excess water in the tank, and wipe down everything inside and outside to remove any condensation or water droplets that remain. Why, you ask? That miracle epoxy needs a totally dry environment in order to adhere to the toilet’s materials and seal that crack properly.

Patch Hairline Cracks with Epoxy. After you’ve identified the type of crack in need of repair, determine whether it’s worth fixing with epoxy or if you’ll need to replace the entire toilet. When you experience cracks on the inside of your tank over 1/16 inch wide, you should most likely replace your tank. Hairline cracks around the outside of the toilet are often shallow, and can be repaired by applying plumbing epoxy to seal them.

NOTE: When removing the toilet tank’s lid, cautiously use both hands as the lid is very heavy and susceptible to breaking if dropped. Carefully lift it off of the tank and place it onto a folded towel or another type of padding.

A great way to ensure you’ve completely dried out the tank area on your toilet is to use an electric hair dryer on the highest heat setting. Take your time and move all around the bottom and sides of the tank until its bone dry and ready for epoxy!

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Sink Installation

Early indoor sinks were designed purely for function, with little regard to aesthetics. Modern sinks, however, are often as visually striking as they are practical, and many come with a few bells and whistles (filtered water dispensers, garbage disposal units, etc.) that make them even more versatile. Whether it resides in a kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, or garage, a sink is a handy little contraption that most homeowners will use multiple times a day. There comes a time in every sink’s life, however, when function becomes compromised enough that homeowners must consider replacement. If you know what to look for in a replacement sink and have a good idea what kind of contractor to contact for the job, the new fixture you choose will enhance the space it’s installed in both practically and aesthetically, too.

Creating an Environmentally (and Economically) Friendly Sink. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, “Faucets account for more than 15 percent of indoor household water use—more than 1 trillion gallons of water across the United States each year.” That’s not only a lot of water, it’s a lot of utility costs, too! Fortunately for today’s homeowner, using less water is a snap. In the same way that the EPA’s EnergyStar label means that an appliance meets a certain level of energy-efficiency, a faucet that carries an EPA-approved WaterSense label (or a WaterSense accessory that can be installed on an existing faucet) means that the fixture meets a certain level of water efficiency. This means lower utility bills for you and less water needlessly wasted in general.

Choose a Contractor Before You Choose a Sink. Many people pick the sink they want to purchase before they pick the contractor that will install it. Though this can certainly work out well in some cases, there’s good reason to choose your contractor before settling on a particular model of sink. Contractors have experience that the average homeowner doesn’t. Not only will a good contractor leave you with a flawless installation, he or she will also be able to give you advice on the models of sinks that perform well over the long haul. You don’t always have to go with your contractor’s choice, but a person who has seen these fixtures in action (and has likely heard a number of complaints about specific popular models) is always worth listening to. There are certainly plenty of instances of uninitiated homeowners performing this job successfully, but make sure you don’t go into it without all the knowledge you need. Many resources (both online and off) exist to tell you just what to do, and any professional you have a working relationship with will likely be happy to give you advice on how to do the job right. Remember: A professional on a video or in a book can make just about any home improvement project look easy! Make sure you have an excellent understanding of any task you plan on doing yourself, or the results may end up costing you a lot more than hiring a pro in the first place!

Sink Installation as Part of a Larger Remodel. Sometimes a sink that functions very poorly requires immediate replacement; often, however, sink replacement is a part of a larger remodeling project. Bundling this task together with a number of others has many benefits including but not limited to: Lower cost, more versatility, and a more coherent aesthetic. If your sink needs to be replaced immediately, there’s no reason to put it off. However, if there is no urgent need to replace it, waiting until you have the money for a larger remodel may be a good idea.

Installing a Utility Sink. Beware: There’s a lot more to installing a utility sinks than many homeowners first imagine. Along with running pipe and hoses, you’ll need to make sure that your drains properly and is properly vented. In colder climates, you need to take freezing temperatures into account, as frozen pipes can cause a big mess even if they’re located in a garage.

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Faucet Installation

As a song says, “Even the best fall down sometimes” – same as our faucets can last for decades, but over time their function and appearance tends to degrade. Once your faucet has begun to function poorly (or if it just plain doesn’t look good anymore), replacement is usually a cost effective and relatively quick solution. When it comes to any plumbing fixture replacement, one of the first things you should consider is the water efficiency of the new fixture you’ll be installing. While hardly your only concern when picking out your new faucet, buying water efficient appliances, fixtures, and components is an effective way to help the environment and cut down on utility costs, too. The task of faucet replacement becomes far more involved when you’re looking to add features like garbage disposal units or under-the-sink water filtration systems. Not only do these features require careful attention to the dimensions under your sink, they can involve electrical work, too.

If your faucet is relatively new and doesn’t show any signs of serious corrosion, a handy homeowner is likely to be able to pull this operation off successfully. Before you attempt it, though, read the manual that comes with your new faucet carefully and use a few trusted resources (either online or off) to get a better understanding of what this job will entail. If you’re budget conscious, one of the things that you may possibly consider is if you will do your own faucet replacement or hire a pro. Though replacing a faucet isn’t exactly rocket science, old fixtures, broken shut-off valves, and corroded connections can all make this job a lot more difficult than many homeowners imagine. Obviously, doing the job yourself can save you a significant amount of money in theory, but if the reality leads to a flooded room and the need for immediate professional attention, that bargain you’re chasing is likely to cost you plenty. Bare-bones faucet replacement can be extremely DIY-friendly, but when you are upgrading a sink with features and components that weren’t present before, professional installation might be a worthwhile investment. Who to Hire? If you’ve decided to leave any of these jobs to a professional, your first thought is probably to hire a plumber. This is certainly one way to go, but there’s another option for jobs that are not extremely involved that may suit your needs better. Professional handyman services specialize in doing a number of different small repairs. A good handyman can handle all sorts of minor electrical, plumbing, carpentry, and heating and cooling tasks all in a single visit. This means that your list of little fixes can all be remedied in one day, saving you the hassle of hiring multiple service professionals as well as saving you money by limiting the number of fees many professionals charge for coming to your home. If you have a number of small jobs that need to be done around the house, a handyman service is an effective solution; make sure you give the service a detailed list of the jobs you want done before they arrive, so they can show up with all the tools and equipment they’ll need for each job.

Outdoor Spigots are exposed to hazards that indoor faucets are not, and though manufacturers do their best to make these fixtures extra tough, leaky, rusty, and corroded outdoor spigots are extremely common. Replacing these fixtures can be a snap in some cases and a real hassle in others; it all depends on how the spigot is connected to the pipe extending from your home. In some cases, the spigot will be soldered to the pipe, and a torch must be used to get the spigot off–a task many homeowners are simply not going to attempt. In other cases, the spigot is attached to the pipe with a threaded adapter; all you have to do is purchase a new spigot that will fit the adapter, unscrew the old one, and screw on the new (after turning off the water supply first, of course).

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Garbage Disposal Installation

When problems arise, the importance of a garbage disposal is hard to miss although we must admit that it often goes unnoticed until it ceases to function properly. Plugged sinks, pooled dish water, and piercing noises are typical of this situation, and while many of these issues can be alleviated by simple repairs, sometimes replacement is the only practical option. If you’re replacing an existing disposal unit with a new one, the line is a little less clear. In fact, though garbage disposal units are often championed as being good for the environment, some plumbing systems–and even municipal sewage lines–may not be up to the task of handling the shredded waste that leaves a garbage disposer. An important decision to make is to go all a Pro or Do It Yourself? If, as many homeowners do, you decide that the do-it-yourself route simply isn’t for you, you’ll need to hire a professional for this job. For most of us, the knee-jerk reaction is to hire a plumber or to have the unit installed by the company you buy the disposer from. It may be rather beneficial, however, to look to a different kind of service professional for this job. The job will not only require a certain amount of plumbing work, but electrical work, as well. In this scenario, it’s easy to understand why most folks hire a professional for the job. By hiring a handyman service instead of a plumber, you can get all of these small tasks completed in a single visit. This saves you the hassle of calling a different pro for each job, and saves you money, to boot. As they recommend at Consumer Reports: Your local sewage authority may have a policy in place regulating or even discouraging garbage disposer use, so make sure to call before you install if you’re not positive. Some companies offer extensive warranties that cover just about anything that can go wrong for a year or two after the unit is installed.

Comparison shopping. You’ll want to look at a number of different characteristics including physical size, power, energy consumption, and the warranty it comes with. You’ll also need to decide whether you get a continuous or batch feed model, the later being a little more expensive, but safer for households with small children.

Check  Warranty. Certainly not the largest investment you’ll make in your home, your new garbage disposal unit is still an item that takes time and money to replace. Some companies offer extensive warranties that cover just about anything that can go wrong for a year or two after the unit is installed; a few will even send one of their own guys to your home to do the work for free. The warranties issues by other companies may not be so comprehensive, and can be voided for any number of reasons. Like the disposal units, themselves, warranties are easy to overlook when everything’s functioning properly. It’s always a good idea, however, to know what you’ll be up against if and when problems do arise.

Repair Vs. Replacement. While it is extremely difficult to say with authority which is the better option for your particular situation, if your garbage disposer has been under your sink for decades, there’s a very good chance that a new model will represent a significant upgrade. Old units require more time to do their job, and waste water in the process. A brand new model will perform its work faster and more effectively while simultaneously using less water and probably less electricity, too.

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Garbage Disposal Installation

When problems arise, the importance of a garbage disposal is hard to miss although we must admit that it often goes unnoticed until it ceases to function properly. Plugged sinks, pooled dish water, and piercing noises are typical of this situation, and while many of these issues can be alleviated by simple repairs, sometimes replacement is the only practical option. If you’re replacing an existing disposal unit with a new one, the line is a little less clear. In fact, though garbage disposal units are often championed as being good for the environment, some plumbing systems–and even municipal sewage lines–may not be up to the task of handling the shredded waste that leaves a garbage disposer. An important decision to make is to go all a Pro or Do It Yourself? If, as many homeowners do, you decide that the do-it-yourself route simply isn’t for you, you’ll need to hire a professional for this job. For most of us, the knee-jerk reaction is to hire a plumber or to have the unit installed by the company you buy the disposer from. It may be rather beneficial, however, to look to a different kind of service professional for this job. The job will not only require a certain amount of plumbing work, but electrical work, as well. In this scenario, it’s easy to understand why most folks hire a professional for the job. By hiring a handyman service instead of a plumber, you can get all of these small tasks completed in a single visit. This saves you the hassle of calling a different pro for each job, and saves you money, to boot. As they recommend at Consumer Reports: Your local sewage authority may have a policy in place regulating or even discouraging garbage disposer use, so make sure to call before you install if you’re not positive. Some companies offer extensive warranties that cover just about anything that can go wrong for a year or two after the unit is installed.

Comparison shopping. You’ll want to look at a number of different characteristics including physical size, power, energy consumption, and the warranty it comes with. You’ll also need to decide whether you get a continuous or batch feed model, the later being a little more expensive, but safer for households with small children.

Check  Warranty. Certainly not the largest investment you’ll make in your home, your new garbage disposal unit is still an item that takes time and money to replace. Some companies offer extensive warranties that cover just about anything that can go wrong for a year or two after the unit is installed; a few will even send one of their own guys to your home to do the work for free. The warranties issues by other companies may not be so comprehensive, and can be voided for any number of reasons. Like the disposal units, themselves, warranties are easy to overlook when everything’s functioning properly. It’s always a good idea, however, to know what you’ll be up against if and when problems do arise.

Repair Vs. Replacement. While it is extremely difficult to say with authority which is the better option for your particular situation, if your garbage disposer has been under your sink for decades, there’s a very good chance that a new model will represent a significant upgrade. Old units require more time to do their job, and waste water in the process. A brand new model will perform its work faster and more effectively while simultaneously using less water and probably less electricity, too.

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Shower Installation

The toughest decisions are made while taking a shower. It’s the only moment we are able to think of nothing but ourselves. We even think of it as the only time to dream because outside that bathroom door is what we call reality. Well, why not make the most of it? We all want a perfect shower design, don’t we? How about we choose the shower design of our dreams? You may have considered those curbless showers that do not have the standard tub and shower unit – instead offering a walk-in design that appeal to a variety of people. Whatever it is that you’ve been dreaming of, always check and see what appeals you the most. After which, what’s our next step? Well, time to install it so that we can start enjoying it.

The Guide. After choosing the shower you want and you’re ready to put it in, keep a shower installation guide nearby just in case you run into problems. While the prospect of installing the plumbing, drain and shower base may seem difficult, even a novice DIY can probably tackle this project in a few days with standard plumbing tools and materials. As long as you know the basics of joining pipes together, you can install a shower successfully. The floor drain of the tub enables tubs and shower stalls to enter the stack at or below floor level. You can position fixtures on branch drains because they have a low rating. In order to install the shower faucet and showerhead, you will have to open the wall to access the pipes. Due to the extreme weight of a bathtub, make sure you have adequate wood framing to support the weight – check applicable building codes as well before you proceed. A shower stall requires a minimum of 1,024 square inches of floor space as well as two additional feet surrounding the stall between other fixtures.

Professional Assistance. If you run into trouble with your installation, call a professional plumber to provide assistance. The damage that can occur from faulty pipe installation or leaks can be extensive and it’s not worth the risk if you detect problems. Sometimes unfortunate accidents can happen in the bathroom that can break a new shower.

Materials:

1.      Basic plumbing tools

2.      Right angle drill

3.      Hole saw.

4.      Hot and cold supply lines

5.      Install a pipe that connects the showerhead

6.      Mixing valve for the showerhead

7.      You may also want to consider installing air chambers (An air chamber absorbs pressure surges, which may reduce knocking sounds in the plumbing.)

Process

  1. Put the pipes in place
  2. Install the tub and anchor the flange to surrounding studs.
  3. Connect the drain with the tub overflow and tub drain.
  4. Connect the hot and cold water lines through the mixing valve and then up to the showerhead.
  5. Before you replace the wall, turn on the water pressure and assess the pipes for leaks at all connections.
  6. Use moisture resistance drywall for best results and seal all joints with silicone caulk to prevent damage from leaks.
  7. Place the tub spout, faucet handles and showerhead in place. Use pipe joint compound and thread seal tape at all connection points to eliminate leaks in your shower plumbing.

Once you finish the shower installation, you can enjoy your new shower for many years. The style and elegance of the new shower can improve your own experience as well as improve the value of your home!

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How to – The Ultimate Guide: Water Softener Installation

We all don’t see the benefit of water softeners until the stains starts to get irritating, you notice the deposits it leaves in your pipes and fixtures, and, in some cases, the smell reach annoyances of the homeowners who would rather be without it. The number of water softening units on the market today is formidable. With an experienced professional on your side, not only will installation be a snap, you’ll also get sound advice on which of these units will best meet your own particular needs. Fortunately, there are numerous water softeners on the market that will begin alleviating these issues as soon as they are installed.

Issues with Salt and Water Softening Agents. Many water softeners designed for residential installation use sodium ions to replace calcium and magnesium (two primary culprits in creating hard water). While this does not present a problem for most homeowners, those on strict low-salt diets should definitely be aware of the amount of sodium softened water can contain. In some cases, an additional filter can be installed to remove excess salt from softened water. Using sodium to soften water also has an effect on certain other home components. Salt is corrosive, and just as the salt on winter roads can eventually cause the underside of cars to age more quickly, salt in pipes and water heaters can have a similarly adverse effect. When dealing with very hard water, salt resin is extremely effective. However, for those dealing with water that contains fewer hardening minerals, potassium resins may be used instead of salt resins. Though not an option for every homeowner, having your water tested may show that potassium resins will work for your situation.

Just to start off, why replace if you already have an existing water softener? Well, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, outdated water softening units “…can use 25 gallons of water or more per day, or up to 10,000 gallons per year.” It should be noted that the degree of efficiency can vary considerably from one water softener to the next, so doing research on the various units you’re considering is a must. Online resources offer ratings and reviews that would have been difficult (if not impossible) to access years ago, but discussing your options with a certified, experienced professional is never a bad idea.

Installing Your First Water Softener ? Just so you know DIY may not be the best idea. Though the function of a water softener is relatively simple, installing one to work effectively and efficiently requires knowledge of plumbing that many homeowners do not possess. Good quality water that comes right out of the tap is something that many Americans have become accustomed to. If you’ve recently moved to an area where hard water is common and have never had to deal with this issue before, the installation of a water softener is probably high on your to-do list. Additionally, the warranty on a new water softening unit may require you to have it professionally installed. The good news is, while this task might be somewhat prohibitive for homeowners without experience to perform, it is typically a quick task when performed by a professional.

Preparing for Softened Water. Water softeners can make hard water taste better and will remove the calcium and magnesium that leave deposits in your pipes, but salt-softened water has a few foibles that are bound to throw off uninitiated homeowners. Salt causes soap to produce more suds; it also makes things (even hair and skin) more difficult to rinse off. Salt-softened water will have a greatly-reduced amount of hardening minerals, but it will not necessarily be “purified”; some systems that do not use salt to prevent mineral deposits also act as a water purification system, however.

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